Category Archives: business model

The Simple Tool You Can Use to Keep People Accountable

You can get an immediate jump in productivity.

Accountability is a topic that lots of CEOs and leaders talk about. Specifically, most of their concern is that they don’t feel like their people hold themselves accountable to the things they need to do in driving higher levels of performance throughout the organization.

Continue reading The Simple Tool You Can Use to Keep People Accountable

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How to Monetize the Data in Your Business

A three-tiered approach to the monetization of data that follows the framework of Aggregation, Analytics, and Actionable Predictions.

Just about every business is awash in data these days. From data about your customers and their buying habits to data about the market in general, you have an enormous amount of information right at your fingertips. But the question then becomes: how can you monetize that data? Continue reading How to Monetize the Data in Your Business

Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

 

Thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, boring. The best mission statements, are both inspirational and to the point.

Mission statements are critically important to your organization because they drive alignment in your organization toward the vision of what you want to get done. That’s why it should be the inspiration that your organization rallies around. Unfortunately, many thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, BORING!contact-us-phone-and-email

Continue reading Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

Great leaders and managers know these 3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

There is a common theme that many leaders struggle with: they don’t know how to hold their people accountable. Even if they are great at hiring A players, many leaders still are left with that feeling that their people could be doing more or better work.

Rather than first finding fault with the employee, a great leader looks first at him or herself. And when you take that look in the mirror, you might find that you have not been effective at holding your people accountable for their results.

The good news is that you can rectify this today and become a better leader with the help of three simple steps: Continue reading 3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

With the New Year right around upon us, here are 5 trends that will impact your business in 2018 and beyond:

  1. Lack of “Place” Accelerates

In the coming year, we will continue to see a diminished importance of the need to have a physical location to work in. Thanks to the widespread evolution of mobile platforms, where we now have high-performance computers in our hands, most of us can now work from anywhere.talk to us Continue reading 5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

It all begins with answering a crucial question: What makes your business unique?

Southwest Airlines, Google and the Ritz Carlton are three of the most successful companies around. But what makes each of them so successful?

The answer is that all three of these companies have a crystal clear understanding about what their basis for competition is and have completely aligned their business around that.

Let me explain, with a nod to Michael Porter and Brian Tracy. join_now

Continue reading The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

How to Try Before You Buy a Company

While lots of mergers fail, and if you had to pick one reason – it is companies rushing in without really vetting the potential match.

It seems there is news everyday about a proposed merger or acquisition between two companies. While buying another company is certainly a viable strategy for helping your company achieve your long-term vision, the statistics about the failure rate of acquisitions is certainly sobering. One KPMG study found, for example, that 83% of all M&A deals end in failure.talk to us

Continue reading How to Try Before You Buy a Company

Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Warren Buffett knows great financials are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes from having a strong “machine” and an impenetrable “moat” for your business.

When you ask most CEOs about their vision for their business, they usually give you an answer built around metrics like number of customers, market share, or profitability.

But what I would argue is that while all of those numbers are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes that result from having a strong “machine” and a “moat” for your business.contact us now Continue reading Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

Thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, boring. The best mission statements, are both inspirational and to the point.

Mission statements are critically important to your organization because they drive alignment in your organization toward the vision of what you want to get done. That’s why it should be the inspiration that your organization rallies around. Unfortunately, many thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, BORING! talk to us

The best mission statements, on the other hand, are both inspirational and to the point.

Consider the example of Apple. When Steve Jobs started the now iconic company, his mission statement was: “To make a contribution to the world by making tools for the mind that advance humankind.” Wow; that’s something I would get out of bed in the morning for.

But as much as Apple has contributed to the advance of technology, the company has come under increasing criticism that it has lost its way since Jobs passed away in 2011.

One of the changes the company has made in the years since is to change that original mission statement, which now reads like this: “Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world, along with OS X, iLife, iWork and professional software. Apple leads the digital music revolution with its iPods and iTunes online store. Apple has reinvented the mobile phone with its revolutionary iPhone and App store, and is defining the future of mobile media and computing devices with iPad.”

 

Which mission statement do you prefer? While the newer version is very specific about what the company does, it certainly fails to meet the criteria I suggested earlier: it’s not inspiring and it’s certainly not brief and to the point.

Now compare Apple’s latest mission statement with some other major companies. For many years, Pepsi’s mission statement was: “Beat Coke.” That’s certainly simple and while it doesn’t get into the tactics of how they will fulfill that mission, it gives everyone in the organization a clear vision of what they need to accomplish.

Another great example comes from Medtronic, the medical device manufacturer, whose mission statement is: “To extend human life.” That’s an exciting mission and certainly something that is inspirational for anyone who works inside the business producing products like pacemakers and defibrillators.

But you don’t have to be a major corporation to have a great mission statement. I worked with a business that competed in the exciting field of humidity measurement. It’s not a big market, maybe $500 million in total, but this company established its mission as: “Global domination of the humidity measurement industry.” Not only is that clear and inspirational, it gives everyone plenty of scope for the business to aim at over the next several years.

What happens in situations like what we see with Apple is that you are trying to please everyone. You worry about offending someone, or leaving someone out. But by trying to be inclusive and non-offensive, you lose that focus and inspirational tone you need for your mission statement to be meaningful. That then leads you down the path of a favorite quote of mine from the movie RoboCop where executive Dick Jones says, “Good business is where you find it.” It basically means, “We will do anything for anybody, if we can make money”. That’s not too inspirational.

In other words, you chase every opportunity you can–which can be the worst thing for your organization to do. As I have written about before, your organization is actually defined by what you say no to.

Worse than trying to please everyone are mission statements designed by committees. Mission statements are also like strategy in that they are best done in smaller groups–preferably one using the seven plus or minus two rule. When you give the job of crafting your mission statement to a committee, you end up with boring, multi-syllabic paragraphs that say a lot about nothing, much like the one from Apple.

So take another look your company’s mission statement. If you start yawning when you read it, it’s time to make a change by making it shorter, tighter and more inspirational. Grab a small team – be bold, say no to lots of things and inspire your team!

Want to Win? Keep Your Strategy Short and Sweet

When it comes to communicating about your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.contact is we help you grow

Everyone who runs a successful business believes that they have the best people working for them. And that’s no accident since we invest so much time and effort in screening and interviewing people to ensure they are smart, capable, and a culture-fit all in one.

But the truth is that no matter how hard you work on attracting and hiring the best of the best, the collective intelligence of your organization is still just about average, especially if you have a larger operation. Maybe your organization is the exception and you are really, really good at hiring–but that only means the total team might be 5% to 10% smarter than everyone else. It all comes back to averages. It’s just a mathematical reality.

At the same time, one of the aspects that set great leaders apart from the pack is that they tend to have special skills–particularly the ability to see over the next hill and make connections and correlations that the rest of us can’t. Much of that ability comes from experience, knowledge, and the ability to do complex thinking. These are the people who can see into the future, if you will, since they are the ones who are great at mapping out the kinds of strategies that put companies on the fast track. They can anticipate how doing A plus B, contingent on C, equals Z.

Guess what happens, though, when great leaders like this try to explain their complex strategies to the average worker? They get looked at quite literally as if they were from another planet. Sure, most people might understand A and B, but how the heck did you get all the way to Z?

To put that another way, great leaders need to learn to not out think their organizations.

What this means at a practical level is that when it comes time for you as a leader to explain your company’s strategy, you need to pare it down. Yes, you can talk turkey with your senior leadership team. But when it comes to company-wide communication, make things short and sweet enough to give your team the information they need to act without overwhelming them. Boil it down to a maximum of three elements since that’s the maximum amount of information most of us can process. Not seven, not five–three is the magic number. Then take those elements and repeat, repeat, repeat as a way to drive them throughout your organization.

Consider the classic example of legendary CEO Jack Welch’s reign at GE. At the time, GE was a massively complex organization worth more than $100 billion with its fingers in all kinds of industries like light bulbs, locomotives, jet engines and finance. You can imagine the kind of complexity that went into managing the strategy for that kind of multi-pronged business.

But if you worked at GE at that time and heard Welch speak, he would have focused over and over again on just three things: globalize the business, drive service and recurring revenues, and improve quality throughout the company by embracing the discipline of six sigma.

Of course, Welch could peel the onion or dive deep whenever he needed to. But it was by repeating those three basic elements that he knew he could get everyone in his organization, no matter how average they were, aligned without fearing of talking over their heads.

I actually had a similar experience with a boss, Paul Snyder, earlier in my career. Paul was the CEO of High Voltage Engineering and, while we weren’t on the scale of GE, we were a multi-faceted and growing business with thousands of employees. But I remember even to this day the three things Paul repeated over and over again about our strategy: make the numbers, grow the business and invest in the people. Guess what we talked about every time we got together?

Boom: easy enough for anyone to remember, including me–for many years! That’s the real value in not out thinking your organization. So when it comes to communicating with your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.