Category Archives: entrepreneur

Double Your Income by Knowing the Second Most Valuable Thing You Can Do With Your Time

If you consistently create high value time – you can double your income

If you ask any businessperson what the most valuable thing they can do, they all likely have the same answer: work on their billable hours.

Continue reading Double Your Income by Knowing the Second Most Valuable Thing You Can Do With Your Time

Advertisements

5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

With the New Year right around upon us, here are 5 trends that will impact your business in 2018 and beyond:

  1. Lack of “Place” Accelerates

In the coming year, we will continue to see a diminished importance of the need to have a physical location to work in. Thanks to the widespread evolution of mobile platforms, where we now have high-performance computers in our hands, most of us can now work from anywhere.talk to us Continue reading 5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

The Single Most Important Job of Any CEO

Being the leader of a business isn’t always glamourous. More often than not, your time is going to be spent figuring out where your company went wrong.

In the book Great CEOs Are Lazy (Inc. Original Imprint, 2016), leadership consultant Jim Schleckser argues that the best CEOs aren’t the ones who spend 100 hours every week at the office–instead, they are the ones who know how to effectively spend their time. In the following edited excerpt, Schleckser, the CEO of the Inc. CEO Project, a coaching and peer advisory organization, explains why that many executives struggle to find time to address organizational problems.contact us today

Continue reading The Single Most Important Job of Any CEO

The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

It all begins with answering a crucial question: What makes your business unique?

Southwest Airlines, Google and the Ritz Carlton are three of the most successful companies around. But what makes each of them so successful?

The answer is that all three of these companies have a crystal clear understanding about what their basis for competition is and have completely aligned their business around that.

Let me explain, with a nod to Michael Porter and Brian Tracy. join_now

Continue reading The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

How to Scale Your Company By Shifting From Talent to Systems

 

Eventually you can’t count on superhero employees and have to deploy systems if you want to scale.

In the earliest days of most companies, entrepreneurs can’t afford the systems that exist in bigger companies. Instead, entrepreneurs rely on hiring super-talented people skilled in doing everything from serving clients and delivering products to closing the books.

Continue reading How to Scale Your Company By Shifting From Talent to Systems

How to Try Before You Buy a Company

While lots of mergers fail, and if you had to pick one reason – it is companies rushing in without really vetting the potential match.

It seems there is news everyday about a proposed merger or acquisition between two companies. While buying another company is certainly a viable strategy for helping your company achieve your long-term vision, the statistics about the failure rate of acquisitions is certainly sobering. One KPMG study found, for example, that 83% of all M&A deals end in failure.talk to us

Continue reading How to Try Before You Buy a Company

Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Warren Buffett knows great financials are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes from having a strong “machine” and an impenetrable “moat” for your business.

When you ask most CEOs about their vision for their business, they usually give you an answer built around metrics like number of customers, market share, or profitability.

But what I would argue is that while all of those numbers are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes that result from having a strong “machine” and a “moat” for your business.contact us now Continue reading Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Are You an Owner or an Operator: Why You Might Need To Fire Yourself?

A word of caution for any entrepreneur who has founded a business and remains active in it: you might need to fire your CEO – yourself.

Of course, every owner of a growing business knows what it’s like to play multiple roles. But let’s focus on the distinction between two of them: owner and CEO.

Continue reading Are You an Owner or an Operator: Why You Might Need To Fire Yourself?

Why Netflix Doesn’t Tolerate Brilliant Jerks

What do you do when someone who is unquestionably brilliant is also a jerk?

We all work with someone who is unquestionably brilliant. You know the type: the person who consistently comes up with great insights and ideas and who can cut to the quick far faster than anyone else in the organization. It’s hard not to step back and admire how the person’s brain works.contact us now

At the same time, such people can begin to think their gifts place them above everyone else in the organization. They tend to hog all the airtime at meetings by intimidating and maybe even ridiculing those who might have the audacity to offer their own take on a situation–thus suppressing collaboration and participation throughout the rest of the organization. They also follow their own rules and are evenabusive to the rest of the staff. They aren’t nice people to be around. In other words, these people are jerks–which creates real issues within your organization.

But since they are brilliant, what should you, as the leader of the organization, do about it?

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has been very clear about what his organization does with its brilliant jerks: It gets rid of them. As he has said in the past about them: “Some companies tolerate them. For us, the cost to effective teamwork is too high.”

What Hastings came to realize is that regardless of how smart or even how productive such employees might be, they can actually begin to rip an organization apart from the inside if they don’t buy into the organization’s values and embrace working collaboratively.

In my upcoming book, Great CEOs Are Lazy, I call these folks “cultural terrorists” because of how destructive they can be to an organization. Certainly, your first option should potentially be to use coaching as a way to polish a brilliant jerk’s prickly edges. Obviously, you can’t make anyone a nicer person, but perhaps you can make the person aware of how damaging her behavior is to peers and see if she is willing to make changes accordingly.

If these folks are unable to change their behavior, however, then they leave you no choice but to exit them from the organization. By doing so, you’re making a powerful statement to the rest of your team about how important your culture is–what is tolerated and what is not. The longer you let them remain, the more damage they cause inside your culture and to your own reputation as a leader. People will lose trust in your abilities, which can undermine all the hard work you’ve done to build a strong team in the first place.

When you exit a cultural terrorist, it should be known within the organization that the person is no longer with you because of her behavior, not due to her performance on the job. This will set a tone about the kind of culture you want to build and the kinds of behaviors you’ll accept–and the kinds you won’t.

There are organizations where brilliant jerks are welcomed and where they thrive. For example, I know of several prominent consulting firms where individual contributions are valued more than teamwork. And that’s OK if that’s the kind of organization you’re trying to build.

But if you’re like Netflix and believe there is greater collaborative power through teamwork, then you need to act now when it comes to dealing with your brilliant jerks. You can’t afford to wait until after the damage has been done.