Category Archives: strategy

Do you Need a Board of Advisors?

It’s a question many CEOs start asking when their company reaches a certain size: Is it time for me to look for an advisory board?

It’s worth noting that the question relates to creating an “advisory board” which is very different than a board of directors or fiduciary board, which involves legal obligations.

In deciding whether you need an advisory board or not, you need to start by deciding what you want your board to help you with.     contact is we help you grow

 

Continue reading Do you Need a Board of Advisors?

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Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Warren Buffett knows great financials are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes from having a strong “machine” and an impenetrable “moat” for your business.

When you ask most CEOs about their vision for their business, they usually give you an answer built around metrics like number of customers, market share, or profitability.

But what I would argue is that while all of those numbers are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes that result from having a strong “machine” and a “moat” for your business.contact us now Continue reading Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Run Your Business Like You Are Never Selling

To get the best value when sell your business, keep your focus on building a great business, serving your clients, growing your revenue and profits and exit will take care of itself.

Many of the CEOs and leadership teams I have worked with over the years have fallen into the same trap: they get overly focused on selling their company to a strategic or financial acquirer or worse, going public. At one level this is understandable since it is a dream for many, if not most, entrepreneurs and leaders to create a lot of personal wealth through a wildly successful exit from their business. That’s why it’s so common to meet business leaders who seem to think of nothing else.

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But if you make the notion of selling the primary driver of your business, at the expense of continuing to grow a great enterprise, you’re making a critical mistake.

All too often I hear business leaders tell me that they can’t make that new IT investment or ask an under performing executive to leave the business because they are just treading water until the sale of the business closes. No one wants to spend any money, or rock the boat when it comes to key personnel, because they don’t want to jeopardize their big payday.

Strategic buyers and investors are looking to buy companies who have great executive teams in place that not only deliver results in revenue and profits now, but who also have built in the upside to deliver growth into the future. And a pile of recurring revenue is sure to help!

So when a potential acquirer looks at a business that is clearly doing its best just to keep the status quo and not making the right moves and investments, they will see right through that and wonder if the company is now too risky to invest in. Smart buyers and investors look for companies that are continuing to thrive, grow, and make smart decisions – not those who are just passing the buck.

What do you think would happen if an investor approaches your company and asks which members of the executive team they should hang onto – and which ones they shouldn’t? If you immediately give them the name of a vice president who isn’t performing, you can bet the investor’s first question will be: “Why haven’t you gotten rid of them already then?”

Or, let’s say you have been holding off on making that big investment in a new IT system your team has been begging for. What you will find is that when an investor learns about that, they will discount their offer price for your business by the amount it would take them to make that same investment at the very least.

That’s why the best strategy to get the best price for your business is to continue to focus on building a great company – not on trying to sell it. If you were to make the investment in the IT system now, you might even be able to extract a premium from a potential buyer because you have laid the foundation for future growth because of that investment.

Believe me I speak from experience. A few years ago, I, too, was in the process of selling my company. We had received such a rich offer from a public-traded company we couldn’t say no to. At the time, my CFO and I were the only ones who knew the transaction was in the works. As it happened, my VP of engineering wasn’t performing at the time. I had him on an improvement plan for the prior few months and he just wasn’t getting any better. I knew it was time to make the move and help him leave the company. But rather than worry that I would scare off our potential buyer, I let them know what I was doing and why. I told them I was making a decision that was in the best interests of the business – and that was going to be my focus regardless of what happened with our transaction. The buyer was impressed: they told me they appreciated it. The deal eventually went through, before we even replaced that VP.

If you want to get the best price or value when it comes time to sell your business, keep your focus on building a great business, serving your clients, growing your revenue and profits and the great valuation on the exit will take care of itself.

 

Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

Thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, boring. The best mission statements, are both inspirational and to the point.

Mission statements are critically important to your organization because they drive alignment in your organization toward the vision of what you want to get done. That’s why it should be the inspiration that your organization rallies around. Unfortunately, many thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, BORING! talk to us

The best mission statements, on the other hand, are both inspirational and to the point.

Consider the example of Apple. When Steve Jobs started the now iconic company, his mission statement was: “To make a contribution to the world by making tools for the mind that advance humankind.” Wow; that’s something I would get out of bed in the morning for.

But as much as Apple has contributed to the advance of technology, the company has come under increasing criticism that it has lost its way since Jobs passed away in 2011.

One of the changes the company has made in the years since is to change that original mission statement, which now reads like this: “Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world, along with OS X, iLife, iWork and professional software. Apple leads the digital music revolution with its iPods and iTunes online store. Apple has reinvented the mobile phone with its revolutionary iPhone and App store, and is defining the future of mobile media and computing devices with iPad.”

 

Which mission statement do you prefer? While the newer version is very specific about what the company does, it certainly fails to meet the criteria I suggested earlier: it’s not inspiring and it’s certainly not brief and to the point.

Now compare Apple’s latest mission statement with some other major companies. For many years, Pepsi’s mission statement was: “Beat Coke.” That’s certainly simple and while it doesn’t get into the tactics of how they will fulfill that mission, it gives everyone in the organization a clear vision of what they need to accomplish.

Another great example comes from Medtronic, the medical device manufacturer, whose mission statement is: “To extend human life.” That’s an exciting mission and certainly something that is inspirational for anyone who works inside the business producing products like pacemakers and defibrillators.

But you don’t have to be a major corporation to have a great mission statement. I worked with a business that competed in the exciting field of humidity measurement. It’s not a big market, maybe $500 million in total, but this company established its mission as: “Global domination of the humidity measurement industry.” Not only is that clear and inspirational, it gives everyone plenty of scope for the business to aim at over the next several years.

What happens in situations like what we see with Apple is that you are trying to please everyone. You worry about offending someone, or leaving someone out. But by trying to be inclusive and non-offensive, you lose that focus and inspirational tone you need for your mission statement to be meaningful. That then leads you down the path of a favorite quote of mine from the movie RoboCop where executive Dick Jones says, “Good business is where you find it.” It basically means, “We will do anything for anybody, if we can make money”. That’s not too inspirational.

In other words, you chase every opportunity you can–which can be the worst thing for your organization to do. As I have written about before, your organization is actually defined by what you say no to.

Worse than trying to please everyone are mission statements designed by committees. Mission statements are also like strategy in that they are best done in smaller groups–preferably one using the seven plus or minus two rule. When you give the job of crafting your mission statement to a committee, you end up with boring, multi-syllabic paragraphs that say a lot about nothing, much like the one from Apple.

So take another look your company’s mission statement. If you start yawning when you read it, it’s time to make a change by making it shorter, tighter and more inspirational. Grab a small team – be bold, say no to lots of things and inspire your team!

Want to Win? Keep Your Strategy Short and Sweet

When it comes to communicating about your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.contact is we help you grow

Everyone who runs a successful business believes that they have the best people working for them. And that’s no accident since we invest so much time and effort in screening and interviewing people to ensure they are smart, capable, and a culture-fit all in one.

But the truth is that no matter how hard you work on attracting and hiring the best of the best, the collective intelligence of your organization is still just about average, especially if you have a larger operation. Maybe your organization is the exception and you are really, really good at hiring–but that only means the total team might be 5% to 10% smarter than everyone else. It all comes back to averages. It’s just a mathematical reality.

At the same time, one of the aspects that set great leaders apart from the pack is that they tend to have special skills–particularly the ability to see over the next hill and make connections and correlations that the rest of us can’t. Much of that ability comes from experience, knowledge, and the ability to do complex thinking. These are the people who can see into the future, if you will, since they are the ones who are great at mapping out the kinds of strategies that put companies on the fast track. They can anticipate how doing A plus B, contingent on C, equals Z.

Guess what happens, though, when great leaders like this try to explain their complex strategies to the average worker? They get looked at quite literally as if they were from another planet. Sure, most people might understand A and B, but how the heck did you get all the way to Z?

To put that another way, great leaders need to learn to not out think their organizations.

What this means at a practical level is that when it comes time for you as a leader to explain your company’s strategy, you need to pare it down. Yes, you can talk turkey with your senior leadership team. But when it comes to company-wide communication, make things short and sweet enough to give your team the information they need to act without overwhelming them. Boil it down to a maximum of three elements since that’s the maximum amount of information most of us can process. Not seven, not five–three is the magic number. Then take those elements and repeat, repeat, repeat as a way to drive them throughout your organization.

Consider the classic example of legendary CEO Jack Welch’s reign at GE. At the time, GE was a massively complex organization worth more than $100 billion with its fingers in all kinds of industries like light bulbs, locomotives, jet engines and finance. You can imagine the kind of complexity that went into managing the strategy for that kind of multi-pronged business.

But if you worked at GE at that time and heard Welch speak, he would have focused over and over again on just three things: globalize the business, drive service and recurring revenues, and improve quality throughout the company by embracing the discipline of six sigma.

Of course, Welch could peel the onion or dive deep whenever he needed to. But it was by repeating those three basic elements that he knew he could get everyone in his organization, no matter how average they were, aligned without fearing of talking over their heads.

I actually had a similar experience with a boss, Paul Snyder, earlier in my career. Paul was the CEO of High Voltage Engineering and, while we weren’t on the scale of GE, we were a multi-faceted and growing business with thousands of employees. But I remember even to this day the three things Paul repeated over and over again about our strategy: make the numbers, grow the business and invest in the people. Guess what we talked about every time we got together?

Boom: easy enough for anyone to remember, including me–for many years! That’s the real value in not out thinking your organization. So when it comes to communicating with your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.