Tag Archives: business

Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

 

Thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, boring. The best mission statements, are both inspirational and to the point.

Mission statements are critically important to your organization because they drive alignment in your organization toward the vision of what you want to get done. That’s why it should be the inspiration that your organization rallies around. Unfortunately, many thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, BORING!contact-us-phone-and-email

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Top 10 Reasons to Join a CEO Peer Group

A great way to become a better leader – fast

Serving as the leader or CEO of an organization of any size can be a difficult and lonely job. Fortunately, there are many tools available to help you become a better leader–including things like going back to school to get your MBA, reading books, and, of course, learning on the job.contact-us-phone-and-email

But there is also another way to accelerate your learning curve on your way to becoming a better leader: by joining a CEO peer group.

A CEO peer group is a made up of a group of CEOs, ideally who run companies of similar sizes and complexity, that meet regularly to work through business-related issues. These groups are either facilitated by a member of the group or by an outside professional who has deep business expertise. Continue reading Top 10 Reasons to Join a CEO Peer Group

Double Your Income by Knowing the Second Most Valuable Thing You Can Do With Your Time

If you consistently create high value time – you can double your income

If you ask any businessperson what the most valuable thing they can do, they all likely have the same answer: work on their billable hours.

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The Single Most Important Job of Any CEO

Being the leader of a business isn’t always glamourous. More often than not, your time is going to be spent figuring out where your company went wrong.

In the book Great CEOs Are Lazy (Inc. Original Imprint, 2016), leadership consultant Jim Schleckser argues that the best CEOs aren’t the ones who spend 100 hours every week at the office–instead, they are the ones who know how to effectively spend their time. In the following edited excerpt, Schleckser, the CEO of the Inc. CEO Project, a coaching and peer advisory organization, explains why that many executives struggle to find time to address organizational problems.contact us today

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The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

It all begins with answering a crucial question: What makes your business unique?

Southwest Airlines, Google and the Ritz Carlton are three of the most successful companies around. But what makes each of them so successful?

The answer is that all three of these companies have a crystal clear understanding about what their basis for competition is and have completely aligned their business around that.

Let me explain, with a nod to Michael Porter and Brian Tracy. join_now

Continue reading The Secret to the Success of Southwest Airlines, Google, and Ritz Carlton: It’s Not What You think

How to Scale Your Company By Shifting From Talent to Systems

 

Eventually you can’t count on superhero employees and have to deploy systems if you want to scale.

In the earliest days of most companies, entrepreneurs can’t afford the systems that exist in bigger companies. Instead, entrepreneurs rely on hiring super-talented people skilled in doing everything from serving clients and delivering products to closing the books.

Continue reading How to Scale Your Company By Shifting From Talent to Systems

How to Try Before You Buy a Company

While lots of mergers fail, and if you had to pick one reason – it is companies rushing in without really vetting the potential match.

It seems there is news everyday about a proposed merger or acquisition between two companies. While buying another company is certainly a viable strategy for helping your company achieve your long-term vision, the statistics about the failure rate of acquisitions is certainly sobering. One KPMG study found, for example, that 83% of all M&A deals end in failure.talk to us

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Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Warren Buffett knows great financials are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes from having a strong “machine” and an impenetrable “moat” for your business.

When you ask most CEOs about their vision for their business, they usually give you an answer built around metrics like number of customers, market share, or profitability.

But what I would argue is that while all of those numbers are critical to the success of any business, they are really just outcomes that result from having a strong “machine” and a “moat” for your business.contact us now Continue reading Moats and Machines: How Warren Buffett Analyzes a Business

Are You an Owner or an Operator: Why You Might Need To Fire Yourself?

A word of caution for any entrepreneur who has founded a business and remains active in it: you might need to fire your CEO – yourself.

Of course, every owner of a growing business knows what it’s like to play multiple roles. But let’s focus on the distinction between two of them: owner and CEO.

Continue reading Are You an Owner or an Operator: Why You Might Need To Fire Yourself?

Run Your Business Like You Are Never Selling

To get the best value when sell your business, keep your focus on building a great business, serving your clients, growing your revenue and profits and exit will take care of itself.

Many of the CEOs and leadership teams I have worked with over the years have fallen into the same trap: they get overly focused on selling their company to a strategic or financial acquirer or worse, going public. At one level this is understandable since it is a dream for many, if not most, entrepreneurs and leaders to create a lot of personal wealth through a wildly successful exit from their business. That’s why it’s so common to meet business leaders who seem to think of nothing else.

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But if you make the notion of selling the primary driver of your business, at the expense of continuing to grow a great enterprise, you’re making a critical mistake.

All too often I hear business leaders tell me that they can’t make that new IT investment or ask an under performing executive to leave the business because they are just treading water until the sale of the business closes. No one wants to spend any money, or rock the boat when it comes to key personnel, because they don’t want to jeopardize their big payday.

Strategic buyers and investors are looking to buy companies who have great executive teams in place that not only deliver results in revenue and profits now, but who also have built in the upside to deliver growth into the future. And a pile of recurring revenue is sure to help!

So when a potential acquirer looks at a business that is clearly doing its best just to keep the status quo and not making the right moves and investments, they will see right through that and wonder if the company is now too risky to invest in. Smart buyers and investors look for companies that are continuing to thrive, grow, and make smart decisions – not those who are just passing the buck.

What do you think would happen if an investor approaches your company and asks which members of the executive team they should hang onto – and which ones they shouldn’t? If you immediately give them the name of a vice president who isn’t performing, you can bet the investor’s first question will be: “Why haven’t you gotten rid of them already then?”

Or, let’s say you have been holding off on making that big investment in a new IT system your team has been begging for. What you will find is that when an investor learns about that, they will discount their offer price for your business by the amount it would take them to make that same investment at the very least.

That’s why the best strategy to get the best price for your business is to continue to focus on building a great company – not on trying to sell it. If you were to make the investment in the IT system now, you might even be able to extract a premium from a potential buyer because you have laid the foundation for future growth because of that investment.

Believe me I speak from experience. A few years ago, I, too, was in the process of selling my company. We had received such a rich offer from a public-traded company we couldn’t say no to. At the time, my CFO and I were the only ones who knew the transaction was in the works. As it happened, my VP of engineering wasn’t performing at the time. I had him on an improvement plan for the prior few months and he just wasn’t getting any better. I knew it was time to make the move and help him leave the company. But rather than worry that I would scare off our potential buyer, I let them know what I was doing and why. I told them I was making a decision that was in the best interests of the business – and that was going to be my focus regardless of what happened with our transaction. The buyer was impressed: they told me they appreciated it. The deal eventually went through, before we even replaced that VP.

If you want to get the best price or value when it comes time to sell your business, keep your focus on building a great business, serving your clients, growing your revenue and profits and the great valuation on the exit will take care of itself.