Tag Archives: business process

3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

Great leaders and managers know these 3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

There is a common theme that many leaders struggle with: they don’t know how to hold their people accountable. Even if they are great at hiring A players, many leaders still are left with that feeling that their people could be doing more or better work.

Rather than first finding fault with the employee, a great leader looks first at him or herself. And when you take that look in the mirror, you might find that you have not been effective at holding your people accountable for their results.

The good news is that you can rectify this today and become a better leader with the help of three simple steps: Continue reading 3 Simple Steps To Hold People Accountable

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5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

With the New Year right around upon us, here are 5 trends that will impact your business in 2018 and beyond:

  1. Lack of “Place” Accelerates

In the coming year, we will continue to see a diminished importance of the need to have a physical location to work in. Thanks to the widespread evolution of mobile platforms, where we now have high-performance computers in our hands, most of us can now work from anywhere.talk to us Continue reading 5 Trends That Will Impact Your Business in 2018 (You Might Already Know No. 3)

The Single Most Important Job of Any CEO

Being the leader of a business isn’t always glamourous. More often than not, your time is going to be spent figuring out where your company went wrong.

In the book Great CEOs Are Lazy (Inc. Original Imprint, 2016), leadership consultant Jim Schleckser argues that the best CEOs aren’t the ones who spend 100 hours every week at the office–instead, they are the ones who know how to effectively spend their time. In the following edited excerpt, Schleckser, the CEO of the Inc. CEO Project, a coaching and peer advisory organization, explains why that many executives struggle to find time to address organizational problems.contact us today

Continue reading The Single Most Important Job of Any CEO

How to Avoid Mission Drift and Stay True To Your Purpose

Mission drift is an irresistible force. You need to build in measures to help you avoid suffering from this crisis of identity. If you don’t, you might end up running a company that is very different than the one you intended to build. contact is we help you grow

As every company gets older and matures, especially around its tenth anniversary and after, it can be become difficult to remember the reasons why it was founded in the first place. When you look to those organizations that have been around 30 to 50 years and older, it can be really hard to believe you’re talking about the same place.

For example, did you know that Harvard University’s founding purpose was to “prepare ministers of upright character”?

It would be tough to argue that Harvard still operates by that same purpose today even though it’s in the exact same place it was founded back in 1636. So what happened?

In short, mission drift.

This is something that threatens every organization out there and, unless you put some safeguards and preventative measures in place, you could find yourself running an organization you don’t even recognize anymore.

What makes this challenging is that mission drift isn’t something that happens all at once. Think of it more as being nibbled to death by ducks. It happens one little decision at a time, where you go astray by just a bit. Maybe it’s a decision about chasing revenue from a customer that doesn’t really fit with your mission. It doesn’t seem like a big deal at the time. But, when you add that decision up with all the others like it, you can’t believe how you got where you ended up.

Take another example, this time from the retail sector. Entrepreneur Dov Charney founded his company American Apparel back in 1997 because he was tired of seeing American manufacturing shop being shipped overseas. He started his company to create jobs by starting making clothes in the U.S. again.

But over time, the business experienced mission drift. Eventually, rather than focusing on creating American jobs, the company became known for its sexually charged ads. For his part, Charney became known as the Hugh Hefner of retail as the business continued to shift away from its original mission. More recently, the company declared bankruptcy, which should serve as a sobering reminder of what can happen when you lose touch with the values you began your business with.

So how do you avoid mission drift and keep your organization on the right path? Here are a few tips:

Your Board Tip one is to enlist a board that is fully in line with the organization’s mission. Make sure they buy into your purpose and then charge then helping make sure they say something if they think a decision is out of alignment with your values.

Your Executive Team The second tip is to hire executives and leaders who also buy into the mission, purpose and values of the organization. Then exit the people who don’t–regardless of how great a performer they are. While that might be a painful decision to make to your bottom line in the near term, it will pay off big time over the long run.

Embed Mission into Your Culture You can also use stories and symbols as ways to embed your mission and purpose into your organization DNA in such a way that everyone in the organization can make their own course corrections on a daily basis.

Similarly, everyone in the company should use the mission and purpose of the company as their North Star of sorts as they make their decisions. Everyone needs to be encouraged to act on the notion that if something requires him or her to act against those values, they quite simply shouldn’t do it.

Measure the Mission And finally, constantly measure how true you are acting when it comes to your mission. You need only look to the great retailer Nordstrom for inspiration in how to do this. Every day, Nordstrom posts a list of the top ten salespeople in the company: everyone knows who the rainmakers are. But just as importantly, the company also publishes the letters from customers who are saluting those employees who stood out in supporting the company’s mission, which is is to “provide outstanding service every day, one customer at a time.” Seeing those letters every day is a way to measure how well Nordstrom is tracking to its mission.

One day, for instance, the company posted the letter from a customer who couldn’t believe how, after she called a store to see if they had found a diamond that gotten loose from the customer’s engagement ring, the staff at the store scoured every inch of floor looking for it. More incredibly, they also went through every dirty vacuum bag until they found it. How’s that for supporting your mission?

The key again is that as your company gets going, you need to build in measures like these to help you avoid suffering mission drift. If you don’t, you might end up running a company that is very different than the one you intended to build.

 

 

Simple Is Hard: Design Secrets of Jeff Bezos and Steve Jobs

According to many iconic leaders, simple is hard, but it’s also an incredible advantage. So if you make time to make things simple, your customers will thank you.

The French philosopher and mathematician Blaise Pascal once penned a letter to a friend in which, at the end, he wrote: “If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.”

This quote is quite famous and, like many well-known quotes, often gets attributed to other luminaries such as Abraham Lincoln or Winston Churchill. But what Pascal meant when he wrote those words was that he had simply scribbled down what he was thinking as he wrote rather than spend the time to plan and process his ideas before he picked up his quill and ink bottle.

Pascal of course couldn’t edit as easily as we can with the help of our word processing software, so he meandered and digressed as he scratched the words into his piece of parchment, which resulted in a longer and denser letter than he might have liked to have sent.

But this exact same thing happens all the time when it comes to designing our business processes and systems. When we don’t do the necessary work up front to create a design that is simple and elegant, we end up building products and services that are complex and cluttered. Put another way: Simple is hard.

Simple is hard.

This is actually something that great business leaders understand quite well. Think about how Jeff Bezos helped design the way Amazon.com works–especially if you are an Amazon Prime member. Every time you return to purchase something, everything –your address book, credit card information, shipping preferences–is all ready to go with literally one click of a button. It’s incredibly simple to use and it shouldn’t come as a surprise that when Amazon introduced one-click shopping, the company’s revenues skyrocketed.

But what might go unappreciated is how much work Bezos and his team put into making that design so simple. They very likely invested thousands of hours in user testing to streamline the process that we now benefit from. Again, simple is hard.

Consider also any Apple product you’ve ever handled. Not only are they gorgeous to look at, they’re incredibly intuitive to use, so much so that Apple famously doesn’t even ship user manuals. Apple products are so simple to use, even children can literally pick them up and operate them.

But if you know anything about Steve Jobs, you know that he was fanatical about design and he spent countless hours obsessing over even the most minute design detail as a way to simplify it and make it easy to use. Repeat after me: Simple is hard.

Simple is a competitive advantage.

Now think about the processes and systems in your business. How much time are you spending up front to make them simple and intuitive for your customers to use? Have you fallen into the trap of relying on a user manual as thick as your forearm while making the assumption that your customers will just figure it out?

It’s worth thinking about, especially if your competitors are offering an easier-to-use alternative. If you had to reenter all of your billing and shipping information every time you placed an online order, versus just clicking a button, where would you spend your money?

Or what kind of device would you rather buy: one that you can pick up and start using right out of the box, or one that makes you fall asleep trying to pick your way through a user manual? Customers like simple. And simple wins in the marketplace.

Simple is hard, but it’s also an incredible competitive advantage. So make the time up front to think hard and write a shorter letter; your customers will thank you.