Tag Archives: CEOProject

The 1 Question You Must Ask Before You Fire Someone

Does Your Employee Know They Are About to be Fired?

I’ve had many managers report to me across my career as a leader and CEO. And over the years, many of those managers have come to me at different times to express a keen desire to fire one of their own direct reports.

And every time that happened, I always reacted in the exact same way. I tell my

Continue reading The 1 Question You Must Ask Before You Fire Someone

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B.L.U.F.F. Your Way Into Great Communication

Put the bottom line up front to be a great communicator.

When most people communicate or have an update to share at work, either in an email or with a verbal report, they love to share their entire intellectual journey. They tend to start at the beginning, and then explain everything they did to get to the end results – which they save as their big conclusions.

While that kind of approach might work if you’re writing a novel, it’s not effective when it comes to sharing updates in business; especially with busy executives.

Continue reading B.L.U.F.F. Your Way Into Great Communication

The Simple Tool You Can Use to Keep People Accountable

You can get an immediate jump in productivity.

Accountability is a topic that lots of CEOs and leaders talk about. Specifically, most of their concern is that they don’t feel like their people hold themselves accountable to the things they need to do in driving higher levels of performance throughout the organization.

Continue reading The Simple Tool You Can Use to Keep People Accountable

How to Monetize the Data in Your Business

A three-tiered approach to the monetization of data that follows the framework of Aggregation, Analytics, and Actionable Predictions.

Just about every business is awash in data these days. From data about your customers and their buying habits to data about the market in general, you have an enormous amount of information right at your fingertips. But the question then becomes: how can you monetize that data? Continue reading How to Monetize the Data in Your Business

The Secrets To Lose-Lose Negotiation

The best negotiators don’t look for win-win behaviors, they try to find a lose-lose compromise that everyone can accept.

When it comes to negotiating a deal, we have all been taught to try and find a so-called “win-win” solution. But when you watch the best negotiators in action, they actually use a very different tactic. Their goal is to strike what you might call “lose-lose” deals.

Let me explain. Continue reading The Secrets To Lose-Lose Negotiation

The 6 Types of Power All Successful People Possess. Which One Do You Have?

Successful people know that there are six kinds of power that you can earn in an organization and only a few of them are given by the company.

What kind of power do you have in your organization? And by that I mean can you get other people to do what you want them to? While it’s become somewhat out of style to talk about whether someone has “power” or not, the truth is that there are people using power to get things done. And if you aren’t, you might be missing out. Do you find yourself not getting promoted or do you fail to get resources for the projects you’re most interested in pursuing? If so, you might need to rethink how people earn power in your organizations while also finding ways to earn more power of your own.  Continue reading The 6 Types of Power All Successful People Possess. Which One Do You Have?

Top 10 Reasons to Join a CEO Peer Group

A great way to become a better leader – fast

Serving as the leader or CEO of an organization of any size can be a difficult and lonely job. Fortunately, there are many tools available to help you become a better leader–including things like going back to school to get your MBA, reading books, and, of course, learning on the job.contact-us-phone-and-email

But there is also another way to accelerate your learning curve on your way to becoming a better leader: by joining a CEO peer group.

A CEO peer group is a made up of a group of CEOs, ideally who run companies of similar sizes and complexity, that meet regularly to work through business-related issues. These groups are either facilitated by a member of the group or by an outside professional who has deep business expertise. Continue reading Top 10 Reasons to Join a CEO Peer Group

Apple’s Boring Mission Statement and What We Can Learn From It

Thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, boring. The best mission statements, are both inspirational and to the point.

Mission statements are critically important to your organization because they drive alignment in your organization toward the vision of what you want to get done. That’s why it should be the inspiration that your organization rallies around. Unfortunately, many thousands of hours have been wasted talking about mission statements that are, quite frankly, BORING! talk to us

The best mission statements, on the other hand, are both inspirational and to the point.

Consider the example of Apple. When Steve Jobs started the now iconic company, his mission statement was: “To make a contribution to the world by making tools for the mind that advance humankind.” Wow; that’s something I would get out of bed in the morning for.

But as much as Apple has contributed to the advance of technology, the company has come under increasing criticism that it has lost its way since Jobs passed away in 2011.

One of the changes the company has made in the years since is to change that original mission statement, which now reads like this: “Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world, along with OS X, iLife, iWork and professional software. Apple leads the digital music revolution with its iPods and iTunes online store. Apple has reinvented the mobile phone with its revolutionary iPhone and App store, and is defining the future of mobile media and computing devices with iPad.”

 

Which mission statement do you prefer? While the newer version is very specific about what the company does, it certainly fails to meet the criteria I suggested earlier: it’s not inspiring and it’s certainly not brief and to the point.

Now compare Apple’s latest mission statement with some other major companies. For many years, Pepsi’s mission statement was: “Beat Coke.” That’s certainly simple and while it doesn’t get into the tactics of how they will fulfill that mission, it gives everyone in the organization a clear vision of what they need to accomplish.

Another great example comes from Medtronic, the medical device manufacturer, whose mission statement is: “To extend human life.” That’s an exciting mission and certainly something that is inspirational for anyone who works inside the business producing products like pacemakers and defibrillators.

But you don’t have to be a major corporation to have a great mission statement. I worked with a business that competed in the exciting field of humidity measurement. It’s not a big market, maybe $500 million in total, but this company established its mission as: “Global domination of the humidity measurement industry.” Not only is that clear and inspirational, it gives everyone plenty of scope for the business to aim at over the next several years.

What happens in situations like what we see with Apple is that you are trying to please everyone. You worry about offending someone, or leaving someone out. But by trying to be inclusive and non-offensive, you lose that focus and inspirational tone you need for your mission statement to be meaningful. That then leads you down the path of a favorite quote of mine from the movie RoboCop where executive Dick Jones says, “Good business is where you find it.” It basically means, “We will do anything for anybody, if we can make money”. That’s not too inspirational.

In other words, you chase every opportunity you can–which can be the worst thing for your organization to do. As I have written about before, your organization is actually defined by what you say no to.

Worse than trying to please everyone are mission statements designed by committees. Mission statements are also like strategy in that they are best done in smaller groups–preferably one using the seven plus or minus two rule. When you give the job of crafting your mission statement to a committee, you end up with boring, multi-syllabic paragraphs that say a lot about nothing, much like the one from Apple.

So take another look your company’s mission statement. If you start yawning when you read it, it’s time to make a change by making it shorter, tighter and more inspirational. Grab a small team – be bold, say no to lots of things and inspire your team!

The 1 Best Question to Use in an Interview

There is a single question that you can use to assess whether candidates understand the job and if they are A or C players.

The secret to hiring your next great employee might come down to how someone answers a single question. And you won’t be asking what kind of tree the person would be or about her Myers-Briggs profile. It all comes down to measuring performance. Let me explain.talk to us

The authors of the book Who suggest you can immediately begin to distinguish A players from B and C players, beginning with your initial phone screen. You do so by telling a candidate exactly how you will be measuring his or her performance in the job you’re hiring for.

How candidates react will tell you plenty about them. C players, for example, probably won’t be able to hang up the phone fast enough, since they don’t want any part of being measured. A players, on the other hand, will take your bait and get excited for the chance to excel. They might even up the ante by asking you what’s in it for them if they really crush it and exceed your expectations.

It turns out there’s an even better question you can ask candidates to help assess if they are true A players once you have them in for an interview. I learned about this magic question from Joel Trammell, the CEO of software company Khorus, who I wrote about in my book Great CEOs Are Lazy.

Joel believes that CEOs can’t delegate hiring decisions to someone else like HR. He perfected his hiring method by interviewing every single one of the hundreds of employees in his company.

Doing those interviews, Joel found that there was a single question that helped him assess whether a candidate understood the job being applied for and what he or she needed to do to excel in it.

“If I was to hire you, how would I know if you were doing a good job?”

This is a great question because it forces the candidate to put herself into the job and be thoughtful about how she might be measured by you, her boss. The answer you get will tell you a lot about the candidate’s maturity and comfort level with having her performance measured.

If you ask a C player this question, for instance, you might get some stammering followed by some noncritical metrics such as he will show up for work on time and not take extended lunch hours.

A players, on the other hand, will give you exactly what you’re looking for. Let’s say you are hiring a software engineer. When you ask an A player the magic question, he might respond by saying you will know whether he is doing a good job by using three metrics: the total volume of software code he produces on a weekly or monthly basis; the quality of the code based on a limited number of bugs; and his on-time delivery rate in which he hits the targets he said he would.

This would be a great answer because each of the metrics is measurable and quantifiable. You know if you had a group of engineers who were all willing to be measured on those metrics, you’d have a high-performing team.

Similarly, if you were hiring a salesperson, you might want to hear her answer the magic question by saying that you could tell she was doing a good job if she was exceeding her quota and selling profitable business, and her customer satisfaction rating was off the charts.

A key point here is that while you might know what you want to hear from a candidate, leave some wiggle room to be surprised and to learn something new about the position from an A player–someone who might think of a metric you’ve never considered.

The beauty of asking the magic question is also that, after the candidate gives you his answer, you pause for a second and say: “Let me write these down because, if I hire you, this is exactly how I will measure you after you start your new job.”

In other words, you can use the answer to the magic question as a great onboarding tool in which you have eliminated any chance that your new hire will be surprised about what is expected of him after he starts his new job.

How magical is that?

Want to Win? Keep Your Strategy Short and Sweet

When it comes to communicating about your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.contact is we help you grow

Everyone who runs a successful business believes that they have the best people working for them. And that’s no accident since we invest so much time and effort in screening and interviewing people to ensure they are smart, capable, and a culture-fit all in one.

But the truth is that no matter how hard you work on attracting and hiring the best of the best, the collective intelligence of your organization is still just about average, especially if you have a larger operation. Maybe your organization is the exception and you are really, really good at hiring–but that only means the total team might be 5% to 10% smarter than everyone else. It all comes back to averages. It’s just a mathematical reality.

At the same time, one of the aspects that set great leaders apart from the pack is that they tend to have special skills–particularly the ability to see over the next hill and make connections and correlations that the rest of us can’t. Much of that ability comes from experience, knowledge, and the ability to do complex thinking. These are the people who can see into the future, if you will, since they are the ones who are great at mapping out the kinds of strategies that put companies on the fast track. They can anticipate how doing A plus B, contingent on C, equals Z.

Guess what happens, though, when great leaders like this try to explain their complex strategies to the average worker? They get looked at quite literally as if they were from another planet. Sure, most people might understand A and B, but how the heck did you get all the way to Z?

To put that another way, great leaders need to learn to not out think their organizations.

What this means at a practical level is that when it comes time for you as a leader to explain your company’s strategy, you need to pare it down. Yes, you can talk turkey with your senior leadership team. But when it comes to company-wide communication, make things short and sweet enough to give your team the information they need to act without overwhelming them. Boil it down to a maximum of three elements since that’s the maximum amount of information most of us can process. Not seven, not five–three is the magic number. Then take those elements and repeat, repeat, repeat as a way to drive them throughout your organization.

Consider the classic example of legendary CEO Jack Welch’s reign at GE. At the time, GE was a massively complex organization worth more than $100 billion with its fingers in all kinds of industries like light bulbs, locomotives, jet engines and finance. You can imagine the kind of complexity that went into managing the strategy for that kind of multi-pronged business.

But if you worked at GE at that time and heard Welch speak, he would have focused over and over again on just three things: globalize the business, drive service and recurring revenues, and improve quality throughout the company by embracing the discipline of six sigma.

Of course, Welch could peel the onion or dive deep whenever he needed to. But it was by repeating those three basic elements that he knew he could get everyone in his organization, no matter how average they were, aligned without fearing of talking over their heads.

I actually had a similar experience with a boss, Paul Snyder, earlier in my career. Paul was the CEO of High Voltage Engineering and, while we weren’t on the scale of GE, we were a multi-faceted and growing business with thousands of employees. But I remember even to this day the three things Paul repeated over and over again about our strategy: make the numbers, grow the business and invest in the people. Guess what we talked about every time we got together?

Boom: easy enough for anyone to remember, including me–for many years! That’s the real value in not out thinking your organization. So when it comes to communicating with your strategy with your organization, and ensuring you don’t out think it, the phrase to remember is: keep it short and sweet.