Tag Archives: new hires

Mercenary or Patriot–Which Should You Hire?

When you’re hiring, think beyond the skills and experience a candidate might have and assess whether you want a patriot or a mercenary.

When you’re thinking about hiring people, especially those in mission-critical-type positions, you need to use caution because the stakes are so high anytime you make a bad hire. But beyond whether they are an A, B or C Player and the skills and experience a candidate might have, you also need to assess whether they are a patriot or a mercenary. Let me explain.talk to us

The Patriot
Patriots are employees who seek to join your company because they believe in your organization’s purpose and mission. They want to contribute to the cause. Maybe they are drawn by what your company does or how you do it because it resonates deeply with their own personal beliefs. This can be a very powerful draw for some job candidates, many of whom might even be willing to make personal sacrifices like taking less pay, relocating their family or even working long hours for the opportunity to be part of your organization. Patriots are also deeply loyal to the organization and tend to stick around even when times are tough and the bullets start flying. We often see startups filled with people like this who choose a job based on its higher purpose rather than higher pay because the organization doesn’t yet have the resources to offer much in terms of compensation.

The Mercenary
Mercenaries, on the other hand, choose their next job based on how it will benefit them as an individual. You can identify a mercenary right away just by looking at their resume, where you’ll find lots of short tenures and plenty of job-hopping – something that’s common in job areas like sales and software developers. That’s not to take anything away from a mercenary’s skills: they are usually very talented and in demand. The tradeoff is that, unlike the patriot, if a mercenary’s personal needs aren’t being met, they are likely to jump ship at the first sign of trouble. Usually, they are just there for the money.

Why The Distinction Matters
One reason its critical to understand whether you are hiring a patriot or a mercenary is that your choice will impact your culture. Patriots are the people who live your culture on a daily basis and do things the way you want them done. Mercenaries, on the other hand, don’t always think the rules apply to them – especially if they are producing results.
While mercenaries can be very valuable to the growth of your company, you need to understand that they also carry a risk to your culture – at least depending on your business model. If you run a bond trading firm, for example, you might rely on a staff of 100% mercenaries – and that’s a good thing. But for most of us, especially those of us who want to build a company and a culture for the long haul, we need to be careful about how many mercenaries we have on staff relative to our patriots.

Consider the example of a company a friend of mine owns that operates in the government contracting space. It’s a tough business that relies a lot on relationships and social networks to be successful. That means that having a top-notch business development person is critical to any company’s ability to land new business. These folks have a very specialized, and valuable, skill-set – which means they can be hard to find and retain.

In the case of my friend’s company, he was fortunate to hire one of the best business developers around. And this guy delivered: he landed several large orders for the company (that he was well compensated for, by the way.)
But it also became apparent that digesting the work involved with those contracts was going to take my friend’s company at least a year to work through before they would be able to go out and bid on any new business.

Guess what happened? My friend’s business developer jumped ship rather than risk earning less by waiting for the company to chase new work.
This is a classic case of what happens when you hire a mercenary versus a patriot, someone who would have been willing to shift roles or jobs in the interim as a way to stay with the company and be part of its success over the long haul.
Both patriots and mercenaries can play important roles in your organization’s success. Just know what you’re hiring up front so you can plan best for the long run of your company.

The 1 Best Question to Use in an Interview

There is a single question that you can use to assess whether candidates understand the job and if they are A or C players.

The secret to hiring your next great employee might come down to how someone answers a single question. And you won’t be asking what kind of tree the person would be or about her Myers-Briggs profile. It all comes down to measuring performance. Let me explain.talk to us

The authors of the book Who suggest you can immediately begin to distinguish A players from B and C players, beginning with your initial phone screen. You do so by telling a candidate exactly how you will be measuring his or her performance in the job you’re hiring for.

How candidates react will tell you plenty about them. C players, for example, probably won’t be able to hang up the phone fast enough, since they don’t want any part of being measured. A players, on the other hand, will take your bait and get excited for the chance to excel. They might even up the ante by asking you what’s in it for them if they really crush it and exceed your expectations.

It turns out there’s an even better question you can ask candidates to help assess if they are true A players once you have them in for an interview. I learned about this magic question from Joel Trammell, the CEO of software company Khorus, who I wrote about in my book Great CEOs Are Lazy.

Joel believes that CEOs can’t delegate hiring decisions to someone else like HR. He perfected his hiring method by interviewing every single one of the hundreds of employees in his company.

Doing those interviews, Joel found that there was a single question that helped him assess whether a candidate understood the job being applied for and what he or she needed to do to excel in it.

“If I was to hire you, how would I know if you were doing a good job?”

This is a great question because it forces the candidate to put herself into the job and be thoughtful about how she might be measured by you, her boss. The answer you get will tell you a lot about the candidate’s maturity and comfort level with having her performance measured.

If you ask a C player this question, for instance, you might get some stammering followed by some noncritical metrics such as he will show up for work on time and not take extended lunch hours.

A players, on the other hand, will give you exactly what you’re looking for. Let’s say you are hiring a software engineer. When you ask an A player the magic question, he might respond by saying you will know whether he is doing a good job by using three metrics: the total volume of software code he produces on a weekly or monthly basis; the quality of the code based on a limited number of bugs; and his on-time delivery rate in which he hits the targets he said he would.

This would be a great answer because each of the metrics is measurable and quantifiable. You know if you had a group of engineers who were all willing to be measured on those metrics, you’d have a high-performing team.

Similarly, if you were hiring a salesperson, you might want to hear her answer the magic question by saying that you could tell she was doing a good job if she was exceeding her quota and selling profitable business, and her customer satisfaction rating was off the charts.

A key point here is that while you might know what you want to hear from a candidate, leave some wiggle room to be surprised and to learn something new about the position from an A player–someone who might think of a metric you’ve never considered.

The beauty of asking the magic question is also that, after the candidate gives you his answer, you pause for a second and say: “Let me write these down because, if I hire you, this is exactly how I will measure you after you start your new job.”

In other words, you can use the answer to the magic question as a great onboarding tool in which you have eliminated any chance that your new hire will be surprised about what is expected of him after he starts his new job.

How magical is that?

Surprising Questions Great Companies Use to Hire Well

Great companies look at the skill and the will of the potential hire, but they spend just as much time on cultural fit. And many use these four simple questions to determine that fit.

When most people go about the process of hiring on a new employee, they tend to focus on “skill” and “will.” In other words, they look at what skills a person has–like their experience, areas of expertise, and other things they list on their resume–as well as whether that person is willing and interested in working for the company.

But there’s a third category of analysis that most people tend to leave out: culture fit. And frankly, if you want to spend a large amount of your life in contact with them. You don’t get to pick your family, but you can pick your employees!

While we didn’t know it at the time, the most important thing we ever got graded on back in kindergarten was how well we worked and played with others. The same thing is true when it comes to making great hires.

We all know people who are incredibly bright and competent, but who are also not very nice people. They tend to be selfish and self-absorbed and seem to suck the energy out of the room. You simply don’t want to spend time with them. I call people like this “cultural terrorists” because of the damage they can wreak on an organization. That’s why the best companies do everything they can to avoid hiring these people in the first place.

But how do you know how to assess whether someone is a cultural fit or not?

I’ve found that the companies who do the best job at screening potential hires for cultural fit ask some variation of these four simple questions:

Would I like to have a cocktail with this individual? The best interviewers begin by asking whether they’d be willing to spend an hour or so talking casually with this person after work. Are they interesting enough to have a conversation with? Or are they difficult to deal with, socially awkward, or even so self-absorbed you can’t get a word in edgewise?

Would I play a round of golf with them? Golf is not only a great way to spend a day networking and talking shop; it’s also an investment of four to five hours of your time. Is this person someone you’d be willing to ride along in a cart with or even walk beside for that long? If you don’t play golf, substitute, “go to a baseball game” and see if you are excited or thinking of ways to get out of it.

Would you sit next to this person on a flight to Tokyo? Upping the stakes even higher here, but is this the kind of person you could tolerate chatting with over an 11-hour international flight or would you be tempted to lock them (our yourself) in the bathroom instead?

Would you want this person in your foxhole? It’s one thing to ask yourself how you might get along with someone in the best of times. But how do you think this person would react to the worst of them? If you found yourself in the middle of a battlefield, say, with bullets and explosions all around you, do you think you could count on this person to watch your back? Will they remain cool and collected or will they freak out and run for the hills? Assessing how someone might react to a stressful situation is critical for every entrepreneur to ask because sooner or later, you’ll be facing that kind of situation in your business. And you’ll want to count on your team to stand their ground no matter what the odds are.

Now if you can answer yes to all four of these questions, and the candidate also passes the skill and will test, what are you waiting for: make the offer!

But, if you hesitated on answering any of these culture fit type questions, and questioned whether you would truly enjoy working with this person, then just say no. After all, life is too short to work with people you don’t like.